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No matter what the actual topic of my in-person weaving classes happens to be, there’s always someone who says that some random, unrelated tip is the best thing they’ve learned that day. It’s usually a tip for fixing a problem that they’ve struggled with several times, and more often than not it’s this simple trick for fixing warp snags.  You know how it is: your shuttle catches some stray warp...
Sooner or later, it happens. Your warp gets tangled, you make a bunch of mistakes while threading, or you find a treadling error – after you’ve woven four more inches. Or your project colors don’t turn out as expected. What do you do when your project has you ready to pull your hair out? This happens to everyone – including me! – so I thought I’d share my experience with...
In the past three weeks, you have joined me while I designed a project that would highlight my favourite (so far) snow dyed warp. We have talked about how I chose the colours, and dyed the warp in Part 1, some of the tricks I use when beaming a warp like this in Part 2, and in Part 3, we discussed choosing a draft, and we sampled some weft colours....
Welcome back to the Design With Me blog series! In Part 1, I selected colors and dyed my painted warp. In Part 2, I put the warp chains in order and beamed the warp, explaining my special method for warping without a cross and for getting out tangles. Today I’m excited about choosing a draft and getting the warp threaded. Then I can start weaving! Finding a draft: Handweaving.net Sometimes...
Last week, I explained my dye process and showed the warp I’ll be working with. This week I beamed the warp, so follow along with me and learn: First I needed to decide what order I wanted the chains in.  Because I “winged it” for this warp, without much planning, I did not take the time to label the chains in a specific order before dyeing them. I was aiming...
Hi Weaving Friends! I have had a warp sitting in a bin for a while (OK, I will ‘fess up, I dyed this warp in February 2023), and I FINALLY have time to weave it up.  I thought that it would be fun to have you join me, as I go through the design process for a project like this. Now I don’t dye that often, and my results can...
Multiple pattern scales can be used intentionally to create pieces that transform as you walk up to them. It’s particularly important for fashion show garments or wall hangings, which are apt to be seen from both close and far away, but even with accessories such as scarves or shawls, you can create pieces that will offer interest at multiple viewing distances. My “Liquid Fire” shawl, for example, appears to be...
I have just returned from a family trip, and while I was avoiding the mountain of laundry that needs to be washed getting back into my routines, I spent some time browsing through the Academy. I noticed that in each members’ profile, there is a section titled “weaving goals”. This piqued my curiosity so I started browsing through members’ goals. These ones, and variations of these, are the most common:...
Once upon a time, I was under the illusion that more shafts are always better. Because on a loom with eight shafts, you can weave four-shaft designs as well as eight-shaft ones, so you get more design freedom. But why stop there? On a 16-shaft loom, you can weave four, eight, and twelve-shaft designs (not to mention seven and fifteen-shaft designs), and on 40 shafts, well…..! So more shafts are...